consume repeat #3

Nicole Rayburn, consume repeat #3, 0:13 loop, 2016

This series of short videos explores the notion of repetition through the isolation of specific gestures. The series focuses on animal interactions with their environments, specifically involving activities surrounding consumption.

The visual effects applied to all three videos position them in the realm of a futuristic hyper-reality while simultaneously resonating with the popular culture of low-fi imagery of youtube animal videos and gifs. Using humour and beauty, the videos explore the complex relations between species and the need for survival.

In consume repeat #3, the subtle violence of the exchange between the Pelican and the Pigeon is contrasted with the humorous and persistent method of the Pelican trying to swallow a large, moving entity. Organic gestures are mechanized into a loop, and the movements speak to habit, compulsion, obsession, and absurdity.

Pelican Gif 2

Found Footage: Pelican Eats Pigeon
Audio samples by Freed, Kangaroovindaloo, & Reitanna (freesound.org)

Nicole Rayburn 2016

consume repeat #2

This series of short videos explores the notion of repetition through the isolation of specific gestures. The series focuses on animal interactions with their environments, specifically involving activities surrounding consumption.

Nicole Rayburn, consume repeat #2, 1:18, 2016

In consume repeat #2, the subtle violence of the exchange between the Monarch Butterflies is contrasted with the slightly humorous frailty of their bodies. Organic gestures are mechanized through the editing process, and the movements speak to habit, compulsion, obsession, and absurdity.

monarchs 3

Nicole Rayburn, consume repeat #2, Still, 1:18, 2016

The metaphor of the butterfly effect – the notion that the minuscule flapping of the wings of a butterfly can dramatically affect the outcome of events in a larger system, such as weather – emphasizes the inter-connectivity of all entities and actions. When seen through the lens of isolated exchanges between insect bodies, this reveals the potential impacts of small violences, and the larger effects they can have. The piece seeks to reflect on what the flap of a wing might mean through repetition, as a flap is never in isolation. Although there is repetition, duration and accumulation deny repeat experiences, and through this repetition emerges the possibility for reinvention (Deleuze).

Audio samples by Headphaze (freesound.org)

Exhibitions:

2017 Antimatter [Media Art], Victoria, Canada (upcoming)

2016 Binnar Visual Arts Festival, Vila Nova de Famalicão, Portugal

Available for distribution through VTape. Please contact: distribution@vtape.org

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Nicole Rayburn 2017

UsThemThemUs

UsThemThemUs is a video comprised of statements extracted from sci-fi cinema in which characters attempt to articulate a boundary between humans and non-humans. These declarations of difference desperately seek to establish delineations between human and machine and animal, yet often resort to nebulous-to-define traits such as emotion, belief, or the soul. Rather than establish clear definitions of what the human is or is not, these attempts instead reveal a slippery space of boundary determinations. Also revealed are the anxieties and pejorative associations entangled with notions of difference and otherness, particularly when ‘the other’ begins to become the same…

Nicole Rayburn, UsThemThemUs, 5:38, 2015

The prevalence of films and TV series such as Bladerunner, Terminator, and Battlestar Gallactica reveal the modern-day anxiety surrounding the boundary between the ‘natural’ and the ‘unnatural’. Fragmented sentences extracted from these sources scroll through the video, overlap, become entangled and overwhelmingly incomprehensible at points. The delineations used to define the human – soul, emotion, or belief – are vague and intangible and do little to establish clarity between the human versus the non-human.

UsThemThemUs_Rayburn

The visual fragments are sourced from online videos and show humans somewhat violently interacting with non-humans – in one clip and baby and child are attacking one another, and in another humans kick robots. Historically, humans have defined themselves in contrast to animals, which was also a continually complicated and fluctuating terrain, yet the contemporary threat is clearly becoming the machine. The response of the Robotic Dogs to the human kicks in the video shows the scientific breakthrough of the robot responding to an unexpected change in the environment and immediately adapting and stabilizing itself. This development is significant in the scientific community, yet also veers towards the actual realization of an artificial intelligence that has only been until recently, anxiously dreamed about by writers and filmmakers. As the machine and the human rapidly become closer in capability, we must contemplate the realities of what this new relationship with ‘the other’ will mean, and the potential manifestations that it can take.

UsThemThemUs_Rayburn

Text and audio statements are all direct citations from selected films.

Audio Samples: Timbre & Aran Reginald

Exhibitions & Screenings:

2017 UsThemThemUs, Underneath the Floorboards, Hackney Picture House, London, UK

2016 UsThemThemUs, Jornadas de Reapropiación, Touring Program, Faro Aragón, Mexico City, Mexico

2016 Jornadas de Reapropiación (Journeys of Reappropiation), Centro de Cultura Digital, México City, Mexico

2016 Antimatter [Media Art], Victoria, Canada (upcoming)

2016 Experiments in Cinema v11.4, Albuquerque, USA

2015 FACT (Foundation for Art & Creative Technology, UK) and Channels (Channels Video Festival) Artist Bursary Shortlist, Curated by Soda Jerk, Shona Illingworth, Rory MacBeth, and Sarah Tutton. Screening in MPavilion, Melbourne, Australia

2015 Interventions Fuse Factory, Ohio State University Mansfield Gallery, OH, USA, Curated by Tyler Cann, Amy M. Youngs, Alison Colman, Kate Shannon, and Doo Sung Yoo (group) http://fuse2015.thefusefactory.org/

Available for distribution through VTape. Please contact: distribution@vtape.org

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Nicole Rayburn 2017

How to Identify a Witch

Nicole Rayburn, How to Identify a Witch, 3:34, 2014

How to Identify a Witch references historically documented methods used to identify and prosecute a witch. The methods presented in the video, although seemingly bizarre, are sourced from witch hunting manuals, such as the Malleus Maleficarum (The Hammer of Witches), which were commonly used reference texts throughout the European justice system during the witch craze.

How to Identify a Witch_7_Orgies

Simple animations created from illustrations and woodcuts derived from these texts serve to emphasize the absurdity and popular prevalence of the witch craze event, but also gesture towards the problematic belief systems that fostered the emergence of this crazed phenomenon that targeted primarily women and the socially vulnerable as ‘others’.

HOw to Identify a Witch_2_Kissing Butt

The continued relevance of this historical topic is manifold. Persecution in the form of repression, exclusion, torture, and execution, premised solely in intolerance of difference, be that physical, behavioral, or spiritual, is still prevalent. As Joseph Klaits poignantly states in Servants of Satan: The Age of the Witch Hunts, “Plainly, we are not dealing with obsolete issues when we consider such problems as the roots of intolerance, manifestations of prejudice against women and minorities, the use of torture by authoritarian rulers, and attempts by religious and political ideologues to impose their values on society”. The witch is a scapegoat blamed for random misfortunes, but more so persecuted for social position, difference, and otherness – emphasizing the continued importance as an issue of contemplation today.

Audio: Devil’s Waltz Hum by AlucardsBride (freesound.org)

How to Identify a Witch_Rayburn

Selected Screenings & Exhibitions:

2016 London Ontario Media Arts Association, Curated by Christina Battle

2016 Cómo reconocer a una bruja, Lima Film Festival, Video Babel Festival Tour Selection, Lima, Peru (Spanish translation)

2015 Video Babel Festival, Cusco, Peru
2015 [.Box] Videoart Project Space Milano, organized by 28th Festival Les Instants Vidéo, Curated by Marc Mercier, Milan, Italy
2015 28th Festival Les Instants Vidéo, [.Box] Program, Marseille, France
2015 Archivo Queer Italia: Religious Bondage, Cuntemporary, London, UK
2014 Which Witch? SOVA Gallery, Dawson City, Yukon

Available for distribution through VTape. Please contact: distribution@vtape.org

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Nicole Rayburn 2017

The Serpent & The Mouse

Nicole Rayburn, The Serpent & The Mouse, 3:31, 2013

The Serpent & The Mouse addresses the understanding of the serpent as inescapably associated to the biblical story of original sin – The Fall – and problematizes the associations of this metaphor. The demonization of the female position in this narrative, namely Eve, who is forever after burdened with the bizarre notions of sole responsibility and eternal implications, is shown to be absurd both through its malleability and its metaphorical construction. The Serpent & The Mouse also shows a mouse being eaten by a snake.

Serpent and the Mouse_Rayburn_Eve is also Tricky

The same footage repeats eight times in various manifestations, playfully using text to complicate the understandings of the imagery, problematize the position of power, and to re-position the serpent with more ‘obvious connotations’.

Still_SerpentMouse_Stupid_Rayburn

Selected Screenings:

2016 24HR Cinema Festival, Selection from Athens Digital Arts Festival 2014/2015, Curated by Eirini Olympiou, x-church, Gainsborough, UK

2016 Delete TV, Channel C31 Public Braodcast, Melbourne, Australia

2016 Delete TV, Channel OKTO TV Public Broadcast, Austria

2015 European Media Arts Festival Tour, Ankara International Film Festival, Ankara, Turkey

2015 European Media Arts Festival Tour, City 46, Universität Bremen, Bremen, Germany

2014 European Media Arts Festival Tour, ZKM | Center for Art & Media, Karlsruhe, Germany

2014 European Media Arts Festival Tour, German Culture Goethe-Institute, Paris, France, Curated by Ralf Sausmikat

2014 27th Festival Les Instants Vidéo, Marseille, France

2014 Athens Video Art Festival, Athens, Greece, Curated by Erini Olypmiou

2014 Video Art Festival Miden, Kalamata, Greece.

2014 European Media Arts Festival, Osnabrück, Germany. Curated by Joke Ballentijn, Katrin Mundt, Ralf Sausmikat, and Sebastiaan Schlicher

Video available for distribution through VTape. Please contact: distribution@vtape.org

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Nicole Rayburn 2016

Pollination Proposition

Nicole Rayburn, Pollination Proposition, 5:38, 2009

Pollination Proposition proposes an incongruous solution to declining bee populations – a beautiful yet abject human-mechanization of the pollination process. The productive yet eloquent transgression of species-boundaries between orchid and bee during pollination is mimicked in this performance to explore a potential dissolution of hierarchies between human, plant and machine. The Pinocchio figure transgresses the boundaries between human, plant and insect by repeatedly penetrating the orchid flower’s canal with an elongated nose; a sexually referential gesture enacted by an androgynous body that is digitally manipulated to appear mechanical and repetitious.

1. Pollination Proposition. video still

In light of recent reports of declining bee populations and manual human cross-pollination activities, this suggestive proposition highlights human intervention in the pollination process to emphasize the absurdity of such a gesture, while simultaneously acknowledging the complex and affective system of relations between heterogeneous entities. Pollination Proposition acknowledges an entangled system of relations, but more importantly, seeks to recognize intersections of difference as productive sites of exchange – change does not only occur between like species, but among entities of different orders, including between both organic and machinic organisms. Pollination Proposition blurs the distinctions between species delineations, natural and unnatural, gender roles, and performance and digitization to emphasize the potential for relations and affect to promote positive understandings of difference.

1. Pollination Proposition. still 2. 330 dpi

Exhibitions & Screenings:

2012 SuperMarket: Stockholm Independent Art Fair: Video Surplus/Varied Toil, Kulturhuset, Stockholm, Sweden. In conjunction with publication Syphon 1.4: Art and the Economy, Curated by Michael Davidge

2012 Pollination Proposition. Latitude 53, ProjEx Room, Edmonton, AB (solo)

2011 Video Surplus/Varied Toil, Modern Fuel, Kingston, ON. Curated by Michael Davidge

2011 Pollination Proposition. Artspace, Mud Room, Peterborough, ON (solo)

2010 Two Propositions. Stride Gallery, Project Room, Calgary, AB (solo)

2010 Mere Art. Barbra Edwards Contemporary Gallery, Toronto, ON, Curated by Peter Joch (two person)

 

Nicole Rayburn 2015

consume repeat #1

Nicole Rayburn, consume repeat #1, 1:04, 2016

This series of short videos explores the notion of repetition through the isolation of specific gestures. The series focuses on animal interactions with their environments, specifically involving activities surrounding consumption.

consume repeat #1 humorously explores the movements of Great White Egrets as they catch their morning fish, and when they score a particularly juicy catch, their run back to shore. Organic gestures are mechanized through the editing process, and the movements speak to habit, compulsion, obsession, and absurdity.

consume repeat_StillNicole Rayburn, consume repeat #1, Still, 1:04, 2016

Although there is repetition, duration and cumulation deny repeat experiences, and through this emerges the possibility that repetition allows for reinvention (Deleuze).

Audio samples by Klankbeeld, Sailor55, & Markedit (freesound.org)

 

Nicole Rayburn 2016